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What is the best shotgun shell for pheasant hunting?

What is the best shotgun shell for pheasant hunting?

The Common Choices

Most pheasant hunters like #4 to #6 lead shot through a modified or improved cylinder choke. #5 shot is probably the most common load, with a modified choke being the most common choke choice. This combination will work throughout the season.

What is the best shotgun shell for pheasant hunting?

The 12 gauge shells are your best bet, and most of the popular hunting loads will work for pheasants.

One of the most popular of all the popular hunting loads is #6 shot loads, with #5 shot loads, being the most popular.

Many people also like #4 shot loads, with some #3 shot loads being used.

#4 shotshells are what you want to use if you will be hunting a lot of open fields, where you might have a number of shots at the pheasant, and might have to take a quick second shot, if your first shot misses or doesn’t take the pheasant down.

Because you need birdshot loads to be able to take multiple shots, if necessary, your choices for chokes then shrink substantially from the other choices of chokes for other types of hunting.

Your choices are, modified or improved cylinder for #2 and #3 shot loads, and the common choice of modified and improved cylinder for your #4, #5, and #6 shot loads.

You may also want to use a cylinder choke, as it will pattern the #3 shot loads, a little better than the modified choke will, but for the most part the cylinder choke is more than sufficient on these birdshot loads.

What is the best shotgun shell for pheasant hunting?

You don’t want to use a full choke on the birdshot. You will be covering a lot of open space, and you want to keep your pattern tighter than a full choke will give you.

There are many other shotgun shells that may be used for pheasant hunting, but you should stick to what has been proven over the years to work.

The standard 12 gauge shells that work best, are your #2, #3, #4, #5, and #6 shot loads, modified or improved cylinder for your chokes, #8 shot load, for longer shots, and the #7 1/2 and #8 shot loads, for short range shots, when you need a tighter pattern.

Select the shell that gives you the best pattern, and then select your choke, based on the amount of open space you will be hunting in, and how much cover there is. If it is all open, you will want to look for a tighter pattern, and a modified or improved cylinder choke will be your best bet. If there is a lot of cover, you will want a bigger more open pattern, and a full or modified choke will be your best bet.

Whatever the case, just stick to what has been proven to work for those who have done it for years and years. You can even feel free to throw in a few buckshot loads if you like, as the pattern of the buckshot is a little larger than the #4 shot load. But for most pheasant hunters, the #4 shot load is more than sufficient and will serve you well when hitting out to 30 yards or so on average.

I hope this has been helpful for you in selecting the best shotgun shell for you for pheasant hunting!

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